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Biggie’s ‘King of New York’ Crown Sells For Almost Half A Million Dollars At A Recent Auction

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In late August, Sotheby’s announced that one of their auctions, which included a number of iconic hip-hop artifacts, would take place at their New York location on September 15. One of the major pieces up for auction was The Notorious B.I.G.‘s famous “King Of New York” plastic crown, which he wore in a 1997 Rap Pages magazine photoshoot. The crown was set to be auctioned for $200,000, but today it’s confirmed that the crown sold for more than double the price, nabbing a whopping $475,000.

Another major item that went up for auction was a collection of Tupac’s handwritten high school love letters, which sold for $60,000. Other items sold at Tuesday’s auction include a pair of Salt-N-Pepa “Push It” jackets, which sold for $19,000, Slick Rick’s diamond eye patch ($20,000), Fab 5 Freddy’s gold and diamond MTV ring ($28,000), and a complete run of Source magazine ($26,000).

A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Queens Public Library‘s hip-hop programs and Building Beats, a music-based non-profit that specializes in DJing and production.

In a Reuters interview prior to the auction, Sotheby’s senior specialist Cassandra Hatton spoke about Biggie’s King Of New York crown, saying, “I think that crown is one of the most recognizable symbols of hip hop, 20th century culture. Everybody around the world recognizes this crown. You see it on T-shirts. You see it on coffee cups and prayer candles. It’s huge.”

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‘His House’ Trailer: A Refugee Couple Faces Unspeakable Evil in Their New Home

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A refugee story turns into a full-blown nightmare in His House, a new Netflix horror film from director Remi Weekes. The story follows a young refugee couple from South Sudan who moves to a small English town and begins to experience some sort of “unspeakable evil.” It’s a tad vague, all in the name of keeping the shocks and jolts fresh, but the His House trailer below is plenty effective as-is.

His House Trailer

His House premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, and after watching this trailer, I’m sad I missed it. Thankfully, I’ll be able to see it sooner rather than later, as it’s headed to Netflix at the end of October. In His House, “After making a harrowing escape from war-torn South Sudan, a young refugee couple struggle to adjust to their new life in a small English town that has an unspeakable evil lurking beneath the surface.”

His House comes from writer-director Remi Weekes, who said at Sundance:

“For many of us who aren’t white British growing up in England, we always find ourselves torn between wanting to assimilate to fit into the primary culture and then the other side that wants to rebel and pull away from it and discover what is our place and our home. I felt that was a good starting place for this kind of story. I love movies and I love storytelling and always felt that if I could infuse the ideas I had growing up with the kind of movies I like, that would be the kind of space I’d like to make films in.”

The director added: “The two characters are from South Sudan, the Dinka tribe, so we did a lot of research into them. A lot of the ideas and myths within the film are based on the stories that are popular there. It was really fun to research. We went through the scripts again and again in terms of language and food and just little things that will butt against British things and Britishness. I think we’ve been very good in the West to sell a fantasy of what the West is and it’s really convincing. For many people who come to England, they feel like, ‘Oh, this is it!’ And that’s always very fascinating.”

Starring Sopé Dìrísù, Wunmi Mosaku, and Matt SmithHis House is headed to Netflix on October 30. Here’s hoping it finds an audience and doesn’t just get lost in the shuffle.

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Writers Guild Seeks Critical Information From CAA, WME As Talks Continue

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Divestment from affiliate production companies is the final hurdle to end the writer walkout from Hollywood’s biggest agencies

The Writers Guild of America West released a new memo on Wednesday to its members outlining the progress in its talks with William Morris Endeavor and Creative Artists Agency, saying that they have requested more information on the nature of their ownership of affiliate production companies.

“In short: our conversations continue,” the Guild’s negotiating committee said. “For there to be an agreement with CAA and WME, we must negotiate divestment terms that absolutely protect writers’ interests.”

Despite a major setback for the WGA early this year when several key elements of their lawsuit were dismissed, the damaging financial effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have brought the agencies back to the negotiating table as they seek to end a more-than-year-long walkout of writer clients. United Talent Agency and ICM Partners have signed a new franchise agreement requiring them to phase out packaging fees — payments from a studio to an agency in exchange for packaging talent for a project — within the next two years.

While packaging fees were the key issue in the guild/agency standoff, it is affiliate production companies that remain the final hurdle between the WGA and CAA and WME signing a similar agreement. The Guild has accused affiliate studios of being a conflict of interest, warning that agencies could favor projects and talent connected to those studios as it would give them a greater financial benefit.

The favored nations clause in the UTA/WGA deal increased the amount of permissible ownership of an affiliate studio by an agency to 20%, but the Guild has publicly stated that it will not raise the percentage further for WME and CAA, the two agencies most involved with affiliates.

“Our concerns with each of these agencies center on how they and their private equity investors will limit their ownership of production affiliates to 20% and how they will prove over time that they remain in compliance,” the guild said. “As you would expect, reaching agreement with the two agencies most conflicted in these ways requires the utmost care. We are, therefore, consulting experienced corporate merger and acquisition counsel.”

Two weeks ago, CAA announced that they had signed a version of the WGA franchise agreement and sent it to the guild for approval, but the WGA insisted that they would not franchise the agency until further reviews were made. To this end, the Guild says it has requested further details on the agencies’ ownership of affiliates, including:

  • The agencies’ and their investors’ current ownership of affiliated production entities;
  • The current direct or indirect ownership of the agencies, and the agreements that govern their relationship with entities such as Silverlake and TPG;
  • Copies of existing agreements between any affiliate production entity and its direct or indirect owners;
  • Copies of any certificates of incorporation or corporate bylaws or similar documents of the affiliated production entities.

“This information will enable the Guild to evaluate any proposals WME or CAA may make regarding the changes necessary to bring them into compliance with the terms of the franchise agreement,” the Guild says.

Representatives for the two agencies did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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This is the worst thing the crew ever did on Futurama

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It all started when Fry, Leela, and Bender were flying back to Earth following drinks on the Planet of the Moochers, who wiped them clean of everything from pants to the food in the ship’s pantry. It’s a two-day flight back to Earth, and the crew is hungry. They pull off to the nearest alien planet, where they find a new delectable cuisine that Fry describes as “a ditch full of fried shrimp,” while Bender adamantly argues it’s a “hole full of fried prawns.” Anyway, Leela scans the food with her wrist computer thingy and discovers they’re, in fact, edible. She takes her first bite and proceeds to gorge herself at light speed.

The crew brings their discovery back to Earth, where they brand the cuisine as “popplers,” and begin to distributing to a slimy Fishy Joe’s franchise owner. All is going well, as the world scarfs down bags of popplers like there’re diamonds buried at the bottom — then one of the popplers starts to talk. These popplers, as it turns out, are actually infant Omicronians, and the world has eaten 198 billion of them, invoking the righteous outrage of the mature Omicronians.

The Omicronians demand to eat one human for each of their children consumed in this mass murder, but they settle for eating Leela instead since there aren’t 198 billion humans in existence. Lrrr, the leader of the Omicronians, is swayed to make peace thanks to some moving words from the talking poppler, Jrrr. Leela and the crew are saved from being held accountable for their catastrophic behavior, once again — which is probably why they never learn.

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