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Exclusive Lost Girls & Love Hotels Clip Starring Alexandra Daddario

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Exclusive Lost Girls & Love Hotels Clip Starring Alexandra Daddario

ComingSoon.net has an exclusive clip from the upcoming drama thriller Lost Girls & Love Hotels, starring Alexandra Daddario and releasing on Digital and On Demand on September 18. You can check out the clip now in the player below!

RELATED: Alexandra Daddario-Led Lost Girls & Love Hotels Trailer & Release Revealed!

Based on Catherine Hanrahan’s book of the same name, the film is a provocative journey inviting you to get lost within the darkest corridors of Japan in hopes of experiencing fleeting moments of beauty. We follow the passionate tale of love and lust between a haunted American English teacher Margaret and a dashing Yakuza named Kazu as their affair tears them apart and reshapes them across Tokyo’s landscape of dive bars, alleyways, and three-hour love hotels.

Pick up a copy of the book here!

Lost Girls & Love Hotels stars Alexandra Daddario (San Andreas), Takehiro Hira (The Fighter Pilot, The Floating Castle), Carice Van Houten (Game of Thrones), Misuzu Kanno (37 SecondsVise), and Kate Easton (Where’d You Go, Bernadette) The film is directed by William Olsson from a screenplay written by Hanrahan with Lauren Mann serving as a producer.

RELATED: Lost Girls & Love Hotels Trailer Takes Alexandra Daddario to Tokyo

Daddario is best known for portraying the role of Annabeth Chase in the film adaptations of Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson starring alongside Logan Lerman and Brandon T. Jackson. Her other notable film credits include: the 2017 Baywatch opposite Zac Efron and Dwayne Johnson; the disaster film San AndreasHall Pass; Texas Chainsaw 3D; and in Netflix’s rom-com When We First Met.

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The Haunting of Bly Manor age rating: Is it okay for kids?

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The Haunting of Bly Manor is coming to Netflix this October and I cannot wait to see it. The horror series is the follow-up to The Haunting of Hill House.

Similar to The Haunting of Hill House, which was inspired by the novel of the same name by Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Bly Manor is loosely based on The Turn of the Screw, a novella by Henry James.

According to Entertainment Weekly, the new series will follow Dani Clayton, a young American nanny who is hired by Henry Wingrave to watch after his niece and nephew after they fall into his care. After arriving at the vast Bly estate in England, Dani begins to see haunting visions.

Although the plot of each series won’t be connected, several actors from Hill House will appear in Bly Manor.

The Haunting of Bly Manor cast

Victoria Pedretti, who played Nellie Crain in Hill House, will portray Dani Clayton in Bly Manor. Henry Thomas (Hugh Crain in Hill House) will appear as Henry Wingrave, with Oliver Jackson-Cohen (Luke Crain) returning as Peter Quint. Kate Siegel, who played fan-favorite Theo Crain in Hill House, will return in Bly Manor in a yet unidentified role.

Newcomers include iZombie actor Rahul Kohli and English actress T’Nia Miller.

The Haunting of Hill House was so well executed, and also pretty frightening, so if you’re wondering what The Haunting of Bly Manor is rated, then you’ve clicked on the right article.

What is The Haunting of Bly Manor rated?

There is no rating yet for Bly Manor available on the show’s IMDb page. However, Hill House is rated TV-MA for some sex, moderate profanity and violence, and frightening sequences. We can predict that this series will be the same.

There wasn’t necessarily a lot of blood and gore in Hill House, but it dealt with adult themes such as suicide, drug addiction, death, sexual abuse, and depression. There were also plenty of ghosts lurking around to keep you on your toes. I would not be surprised if Bly Manor contained similar themes.

Is The Haunting of Bly Manor okay for kids?

I think it’s safe to say that the series will be appropriate for adults and mature children over the age of 14 years old. Preteens might be okay to watch, however that is up to the parent or guardian’s decision.

The Haunting of Bly Manor will premiere on Netflix on October 9.

Next: Is Ratched as good as American Horror Story or Scream Queens?

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In Hades, the Underworld Is Your Playground

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Ever since I was little, when a family friend fired up their PlayStation and I played my first round of Tekken, I’ve loved video games—but I’ve never been particularly good at them. In a world of speed runners and min-maxxers, I’m the type of player that chooses the easiest difficulty level. I play games for the story, and while I enjoy some aspects of fighting, I’m more interested in whatever’s inside my foe’s inventory. I Google boss battles before I embark, and the thought of trying to solve a puzzle with a timer makes my stomach churn. Aiming under pressure in a first-person shooter? Trying to out-skill other players in a battle royale? I’d rather pick flowers in Skyrim, thanks.

Based on my prior experiences, Supergiant Games’ roguelite dungeon crawler Hades should have been a game I’d hate. There are scary bosses with massive health point pools, dozens of traps and pitfalls, an overwhelming sense of urgency, and no ability to loot your way to a rock solid inventory. I can’t stop playing it.

Courtesy of SuperGiant Games

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My first exposure to Hades came while watching WIRED writer Cecilia D’Anastasio stream it on Twitch. I was mesmerized. The soundtrack was intense and immersive. The art style and voice acting were incredible. The fast-paced hacking, dashing, and slashing, combined with the ever-dwindling HP pool, made my palms slick, and I wasn’t even the person playing. I went to Steam and dropped 25 bucks on Hades that night. I got 12 hours of gameplay under my belt before the sun rose.

In Hades, you play as Zagreus, the prince of the underworld. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to escape said underworld and find your mother. You’ll need to work your way through the biomes Tartarus, Asphodel, Elysium, and The Temple of Styx before finally reaching the surface and facing one of the hardest fights yet. You’ll face the usual bogies, like armored goons and sorcerers with devastating ranged attacks, but other aspects work against you, too. Falling axes? Poison with scarce cures? Gigantic pink eyeballs spawning butterflies that chip away at your health? You have plenty of foes to learn about.

And learn about them, you will. Unlike other games in the genre, to quote the game itself, “death is not a big deal.” Your health will eventually run out, and whether it’s from a magma pool or a pesky miniboss, you will inevitably meet your demise. The more often you die, the more opportunities you have to become stronger. Death is also what allows you to discover more of the story behind your escape attempts. Each time you perish, you emerge from the Pool of Styx, and you can start your escape attempt all over again. My brother reached The Surface in only six attempts; it took me 38. Neither one of us had an advantage over the other. He wasn’t rewarded for his speed, and I wasn’t punished for taking my time. No matter how you play it, this game is hard as hell, and that’s its greatest strength.

One of my favorite features is how easy it is to cater the game to your preferred play style. Eventually, there are a multitude of weapons to choose from, so you can take it slow with precise and powerful ranged attacks, or play as I prefer to and button-mash with your sword equipped. The customization becomes even better with the help of Boons, which are gifts from your Olympian relatives. Dionysus can make your enemies Hungover, forcing them to take damage over time. Aphrodite can Charm them, turning your foes into allies for a few seconds. There are gifts from every god and goddess, and they’re all beneficial in different ways. Customization goes beyond weapons and Boons; eventually, you can decorate your home and add some features to the dungeons you find. As an enthusiastic looter, I was very stoked to eventually add gold and HP restoratives to some of the urns scattered about, giving me all the more reason to smash them as I cleared encounters. There’s even an optional God Mode that makes you more resistant to damage, so if you’re like me, and you’re just Happy to Be Here, you can make it through the storyline without dying quite so fast. On the flip side, if you clear everything quickly and want more of a challenge, there are options for that too: timers, bigger bad guys, lower health, and all sorts of ways to stack the odds and make your victories more rewarding.

There’s something to be said about a story that’s so engaging you’re willing to fight the same procedurally-generated battles over and over again to uncover more of it. The characters you meet are charming and flawed. Zeus is an overbearing uncle, making gross jokes and poking fun at his brothers, and Sisyphus is cheerful, not minding at all that he’s been sentenced to push a boulder around. The more you get to know the characters, and the more you build your relationship with them through gifts of Olympian ambrosia, the more you’ll be excited to start yet another escape attempt. The dialogue is unmatched. It’s moved me to tears, both the sad kind and the kind from laughing. No other game has managed to do both.

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Art, Fashion, Sex: Richard Avedon’s Bohemian Coming of Age

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Art, Fashion, Sex: Richard Avedon’s Bohemian Coming of Age

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