Connect with us

Entertainment

‘Saturday Night Live’ Wins Emmy for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series

Published

on

NBC’s long-running variety sketch series has secured another Emmy.

NBC’s long-running “Saturday Night Live” has won the Emmy for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series.

The win marks the fourth consecutive year that “Saturday Night Live” has earned the Emmy in the category. IndieWire’s Ben Travers recently predicted that “Saturday Night Live” would perform well during the Emmys due to its widespread popularity and recognition among Emmy voters.

“Over the three years it’s won Variety Sketch, ‘SNL’ had 18 total nominations in 2019 and won five times; 2018 saw 21 nods and eight wins; 2017 hit a recent high with 23 nominations and nine wins, including four acting trophies,” Travers said in his article on the category’s likely winner. “So Lorne Michaels’ juggernaut is trending down… and it’s still one of the most recognized programs at the Emmys. Even if voters agree Season 45 wasn’t the best iteration of the series, it’s built up decades of goodwill.”

“Saturday Night Live” beat out HBO’s “A Black Lady Sketch Show” and Comedy Central’s recently-canceled “Drunk History” to secure the Emmy for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series. The show also faced considerably less competition for the Best Variety Sketch Series Emmy than prior years, as popular titles in the category such as “Documentary Now!,” “Portlandia,” “Tracey Ullman’s Show,” “I Love You America, with Sarah Silverman,” and “Who Is America?” are no longer in the running.

“Saturday Night Live” secured the Emmy for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series following an especially unusual several months of production. The show’s team was forced to stop studio filming due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Like several other shows, “Saturday Night Live” experimented with filming new episodes via videoconferencing tech; Season 45 concluded with a third and final virtual episode in early May. The “Saturday Night Live” team has been preparing to return to studio production for Season 46.

The 72nd Primetime Emmys will air on Sunday, September 20 on ABC at 8 p.m. ET. The three-hour event will be hosted by Jimmy Kimmel. Check out IndieWire’s Emmy predictions to get the scoop on which series and stars are expected to win big throughout the event. Follow IndieWire on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest Emmys news, including live updates, as the virtual awards ceremony airs Sunday night.

Check out the full winners list for the Creative Arts Emmys.

Sign Up: Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Entertainment

Dax Shepherd reveals he relapsed after 16 years of sobriety

Published

on

By

After 16 years of being sober, actor and comedian Dax Shepard revealed he has been battling an opioid addiction.

His admission came Friday during the latest episode of his popular podcast “Armchair Expert.”

“An episode I hoped I’d never have to record, but one I felt I owed to all the beautiful Armcheries who have been on this ride with me for the last couple years,” Shepard said in an Instagram post announcing the episode.

Dax Shepard and Kristen Bell with their daughters.
Dax Shepard and his wife Kristen Bell with their daughters. (Instagram)

In the episode, Shepard –– known for his role on Parenthood – detailed the bumps of his journey, most recently dealing with an addiction to Vicodin, the opioid painkiller. For the last eight weeks, he said, he had been “on them all day,” after taking them originally for injuries.

This led to a situation where he was “taking, you know, eight 30s a day, and I know that’s an amount that’s going to result in a pretty bad withdrawal. And I start getting really scared, and I’m starting to feel really lonely. And I just have this enormous secret.”

At first Shepard said he tried to fix the problem himself by slowly weaning off the pills — but it didn’t work.

But this month, he revealed his addiction to wife Kristen Bell and his friends. As of Friday, he is on day 11 of being sober once more.

“I’m making Kristen feel crazy,” he said.

Shepard has previously dealt with addiction to cocaine and alcohol, which he says he has not touched in 16 years. The actor has been open about his recovery journey, discussing it in the past on his podcast and in interviews.

Shepard and Bell have been married since 2013. (Getty)

Actress Kristen Bell addressed her husband’s addiction in 2018, when he celebrated 14 years sober. “I know how much you loved using,” she wrote. “I know how much it got in your way. And I know, because I saw, how hard you worked to live without it.”

“I will forever be in awe of your dedication, and the level of fierce moral inventory you perform on yourself, like an emotional surgery, every single night,” Bell continued. “I love you more than I ever thought I could love anyone, and I want you to know, I see you. I see how hard you work. You’re hard work benefits all of us, and you set an excellent example of how to be human.”

Reese Witherspoon and Paul Rudd

Celebrity throwback photos: Guess who!

Continue Reading

Entertainment

19 Television Firsts (That We Never Fully Recovered From)

Published

on

By

Believe it or not, there was a time when we weren’t bombarded by diarrhea sufferers every 10 minutes, and the president couldn’t put a strangle hold on our eyeballs at will. But once new ground is broken on television, the novel thing tends to become ubiquitous.

To be fair, it’s not all bad! Barney Rubble helped give voice to millions of Americans suffering from infertility, when no other show would address it. Oh, and the news used to be delivered by a monkey. That was cool.

Anyway, for better or for worse, here are a few historic television firsts that we, as a society, have never fully recovered from:

19 Television Firsts (That We Never Fully Recovered From)

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Blue Ruin borrows suspense and dark humor from the Coens

Published

on

By

Illustration for article titled It’s suspense as well as dark comedy that iBlue Ruin/i borrows from the Coen brothers

Screenshot: Blue Ruin

Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by new releases, premieres, current events, or occasionally just our own inscrutable whims. This week: The fourth season of FX’s small-screen Fargo starts, so we’re singling out “Coenesque” movies, i.e. ones influenced by or imitative of the work of those famous sibling filmmakers.


Blue Ruin (2013)

Most attempts to approximate the comic genius of Joel and Ethan Coen crank up the zany—that taste for madcap mayhem, exaggerated hillbilly pratfalls, and flavorful regional vernacular that characterizes so much of the brothers’ genre pastiche. Much rarer are the films that aim to emulate these celebrated writer-directors at their most intense, cynical, and darkly, viciously funny; it’s one thing to organize a screwball heist or caper in the key of Coen, quite another to calibrate your merciless noir to their particular frequency of gallows humor. Jeremy Saulnier, a cold-blooded purveyor of color-coded thrillers, has cited both Blood Simple and No Country For Old Men as influences on his taut second feature, the eccentric revenge thriller Blue Ruin. Remarkably, the comparison is neither off base nor totally unflattering: There is a fair amount of the Coens’ scariest riffs in Saulnier’s relentless tale of the conflict between a bearded vagrant and the family of the man who killed his parents.

Blue Ruin actually suggests what No Country might look like if populated by frazzled fuck-ups of the Fargo variety instead of steely pros like Llewelyn Moss and Anton Chigurh. The film’s anti-hero, Dwight (Macon Blair, who’s since gone on to indulge his own aspirations to the grim side of Coen country), is set on violent retribution but not so equipped to visit it upon his enemies. The act of vengeance that sets the ruthless plot in motion is imprecise in execution, to put it mildly: When Dwight leaps into action from the stall of a strip club bathroom, the ensuing struggle is bloody and sloppy, immediately marking this gaunt, haunted man as a very inexperienced Angel Of Death. And that proves to be the roaring furnace of the film’s tension and humor. Hunted by the Virginia lowlifes with whom he’s ignited a family feud, Dwight makes countless near-fatal mistakes, from popping the tires of a car that could have served as his getaway vehicle to trying to perform a DIY surgery with supplies from a drugstore on the arrow agonizingly embedded in his thigh.

Saulnier never tips the action into full-blown buffoonery—a miscalculation often made by Coens wannabes. Dwight is in way, way over his head, but he’s not a complete yokel idiot. (Though the decision to lie in wait for his foes at the family house, with nothing but a baseball bat with which to defend himself, arguably suggests otherwise, though “self-destructive” and “stupid” are not interchangeable character flaws.) The novelty of the film, adjacent but not identical to the Coens’ affection for imperfect forays into crime, lies in its understanding that credible haplessness can enhance the suspense of a life-or-death ordeal. After all, wouldn’t the average person inserted into Dwight’s situation be as panicked and foolish and susceptible to horrible injury as he is? Saulnier would take that quality to a nauseating, thrilling new extreme with his next movie, Green Room—and in the process, emerge from under the shadow of his chief influences here. You could now conceivably call a new crime thriller “Saulnier-esque,” provided it featured enough painful cock-ups.

Availability: Blue Ruin is currently streaming on Netflix, and available to rent or purchase digitally from VUDU.

Continue Reading

Hot Stories