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Solo leveling Season 2: Release Date, Cast, Plot And All You need to know !!

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After manhwa and Anime fans lend the Korean-based webcomic show with increasing popularity, it’s been confirmed that the show is all set for another season. The official release date was finally announced to be September two after months of speculations.

The first season ended in a mysterious note, which has left a whole lot of questions. The second season will provide answers to all these. Besides, it’s also expected to delve deeper into the mysterious superpowers which Sung-Jin Woo is showed to possess in the first season.

Solo leveling Season 2 Plot

Many loose plot ends that were opened up in season one will be slowly winded up. Season 2 will also have a fair share of monster-fighting sequences, such as those that gripped the interest of its fans from the first season.

Solo leveling is based at the backdrop of South Korea and was composed by Chu-Gong, afterward printed under the papyrus tag and reported by C and D media. The action and fantasy initially accumulated fame in 2016 as a web novel that premiered in Kakao’s digital fiction page, KakaoPage, in July 2016. It was later formally accredited in English under the title, “Only I level up.”

Solo leveling Season 2 Release Date

The manhwa was accommodated and serialized since 2018 by webtoons. The serialized manhwa has been illustrated by Jang Sung-rack, who also goes by the name Dubu and is the CEO of Reduce Studio. The storyline comprises a portal site that was opened up between the earth and the creature world. The episode unleashed a reign of terror, and only a few men and women, known as the”hunters,” can destroy the monsters. The story follows the adventures of Sung Jin-Woo, a helpless hunter that turns into the majority of them all.

Solo leveling Season 2 Cast

A cast list of this next season comprises Move Joon-hee, Gyeong Hye-Park. Hwang Chi-you and Park Hee-Jin, amongst others. A new episode is going to be out every Wednesday in the first language. The English translation is expected to take a while to appear.

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HBO Drama Series Watchmen Went On To Create A New Record At The Emmy Awards: becomes the first comic book adaptation to win the top number of Emmys!

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Hit HBO drama series Watchmen jas been a big commercial and critical success for the network, now the limited series is another big record-breaking success down its sleeves.

HBO Drama Series Watchmen Creates History At The Emmy Awards!

HBO drama series Watchmen jas created history as a comic book adaptation take home the most number of Emmy wins! The limited series had bagged as many as twenty-six nominations out of which had 11 wins! Here are all the celebs who took home the prestigious award.

 

These wins included leading star Regina King taking home the award for best actress in a limited series or movie. Moreover, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II won an Emmy for best supporting actor in a limited series or movie; While both Cord Jefferson and Damon Lindelof bagged the award for best writing in a limited series or movie.

The Series Had As Many As Eleven Big Emmy Wins!

The list pretty much goes on with Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross winning for best music composition for a limited series, movie, alongside Gregory Middleton for best cinematography for a limited series or movie. Wait! There’s more as Victoria Thomas and Meagan Lewis also won for doing the best casting for a limited series, movie, or special.  Sharen Davis and Valerie Zielonka bagged the award for designing the best fantasy/sci-fi costumes.

The series which was loosely based on the popular 1986 graphic novel by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons along with some modern additions done, the nine episodes series went on to become immensely popular amongst fans. In the winning speech, executive producer Damon Lindelof dedicated the big win to all the survivors and victims of the atrocity on which the events are based upon.

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Pearl Jam, John Prine, Fleet Foxes, And More Contribute To A Massive Compilation To Benefit Democracy

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Earlier this month, nearly fifty artists like Hayley Williams, Death Cab For Cutie, and Phoebe Bridgers got together for the benefit compilation Good Music To Avert The Collapse Of American Democracy. The project was a huge success, raising over a quarter of a million in just one day for the initiatives Color Of Change and Fair Fight. Now, even more artists like Pearl Jam, John Prine, and Fleet Foxes have contributed the compilation’s follow-up, this time benefitting voter’s rights.

For the upcoming Good Music To Avert The Collapse Of American Democracy: Volume 2, 100 percent of the net proceeds from the record’s sales will go to Voting Rights Lab, a nonpartisan organization that brings state advocacy, policy, and legislative expertise to the fight for voting rights. The organization also works in partnership with non-profits across the country to secure, protect, and defend the voting rights of all Americans. Just like the last project, the massive compilation will only be available for 24 hours exclusively through Bandcamp, so fans need to be quick about purchasing the project.

The masterminds behind the large-scale compilation record are author Dave Eggers, along with artist managers Jordan Kurland and Darius Zelkha. About the album, Eggers said:

“When over $250,000 was raised for the first compilation — in one day — we were floored and it spurred us to do another. We thought we’d get twenty musicians, tops, for this second one, but in about ten days, 77 bands and singers came through. It was a flood. Every day, the urgency of this election becomes clearer, so we’re trying to send as much money into voter access as we can. The compilation is a bit of concentrated hope.”

Echoing Eggers’ statement, Kurland added: “We could have included 200 artists, that’s how united the music community is around the fight for voting rights. We are so inspired to have this incredible collection of artists in an effort to raise money in support of the important work that Voting Rights Lab is doing.”

Check out the Good Music To Avert The Collapse Of American Democracy: Volume 2 cover art and tracklist below.

Bandcamp

1. David Byrne — “People Tell Me”
2. Pearl Jam — “Get It Back”
3. Little Dragon — “Night Shift”
4. The Postal Service — “We Will Become Silhouettes (Live from Berkeley, CA 2013)”
5. Cold War Kids — “Almost A Crime”
6. Black Pumas — “Colors (Live)”
7. Mark Ronson & Ilsey Juber — “No Time To Die (Bond Demo)”
8. Guided By Voices — “Game Of Pricks (Live from the Teragram Ballroom, LA on 12/31/19)”
9. Phoenix — “No Woman (Whitney Cover)”
10. Yola — “To Be Young, Gifted and Black (Song: Nina Simone, Arrangement: Aretha Franklin)”
11. Ciggy Black — “Flypaper”
12. Arcade Fire Feat. David Byrne — “This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody) [Talking Heads Cover, Live]”
13. Nilüfer Yanya — “Day 7.5093”
14. Hippo Campus — “No Poms (Live From First Ave)”
15. Yoko Ono Plastic Ono Band — “There’s No Goodbye Between Us (Remix by Deakin of Animal Collective)”
16. Yeah Yeah Yeahs — “Criminals (Atlas Sound Cover)”
17. The Harlem Gospel Travelers — “Keep On Praying”
18. Perfume Genius — “Jory (Demo)”
19. Feist — “Human Touch (Nina Simone Cover)”
20. Jack Johnson — “My Mind’s For Sale (Live in Lake Tahoe, NV 2017)”
21. Phantogram — “You Are So Beautiful (Joe Cocker Cover)’
22. Big Boi And Sleepy Brown — “We The Ones, ft. Killer Mike and Big Rube (Organized Noize Remix)”
23. Tenacious D — “Rize of the Fenix (Live from Lollapalooza 2019)”
24. Alex Ebert — “No Jokes Left”
25. John Prine — “Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore (Live) feat. Margo Price, Jeremy Ivey, and Kenneth Pattengale”
26. Courtney Marie Andrews, Liz Cooper and Molly Sarlé — “America (Simon & Garfunkel Cover)”
27. Jenny Lewis — “Callaloo”
28. NNAMDÏ Feat. Lala Lala — “Dislocate”
29. !!! — “Feels Good”
30. Pup — “Edmonton”
31. Beach Bunny — “Dream Boy (Live)”
32. Madi Diaz — “Home On The Range”
33. Sturgill Simpson — “All Around You”
34. Shakey Graves — “Good Listener”
35. Bob Mould Band — “In A Free Land (Live in Seattle, WA 2019)”
36. Andrew Bird — “Tables and Chairs”
37. Caleb Giles — “Focus”
38. The Marías — “Hold It Together (Demo)”
39. The War On Drugs — “Eyes To The Wind (Live)”
40. Aimee Mann — “Batten Down”
41. Chicano Batman — “Invisible People (Live)”
42. Buzzy Lee — “Cinderblock”
43. Fleet Foxes — “Drops In The River (Live From The Ryman)”
44. Charly Bliss — “Ohio (Demo)”
45. The Gossip — “Room For You (Demo)”
46. Khemist — “40oz of Freedom”
47. The Dip — “Friday Mixer”
48. Rhiannon Giddens and Dirk Powell — “Wish In Vain”
49. Margo Price — “Devil’s In The Details”
50. My Morning Jacket — “Big Decisions (Jim’s Demo)”
51. Old 97’s — “Southern Girls (Cheap Trick Cover)”
52. Colin Meloy — “Bring On The Dancing Horses (Echo & The Bunnymen Cover)”
53. Matt And Kim — “Let’s Go (Acoustic)”
54. Songhoy Blues Feat. FOKN Bois — “Don’t FOKN Worry”
55. Wolf Parade — “ATA”
56. Tunde Adebimpe — “Comfortably Numb (Pink Floyd Cover)”
57. Stone Gossard — “Near”
58. Dan Deacon — “Rally Banner”
59. Girlpool — “Babygirl And Mental”
60. Calexico — “All Systems Red (Live in Tucson, AZ 2005)”
61. Muna — “Walk On Water (Toyin’s Song)”
62. Nada Surf — “Stories Going ‘Round”
63. Surfer Blood — “New Direction”
64. Illuminati Hotties — “Content//Bedtime / Superiority Complex”
65. Mexican Institute Of Sound — “La Cura”
66. Marginal Prophets — “What The Man Don’t Know (Won’t Hurt Him)”
67. Michelle — “Sunrise (Remix)”
68. Whitney — “Valleys (My Love) (Live from SPACE)”
69. Bright Eyes — “Pan and Broom (Demo)”
70. Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit — “Fooled Around and Fell In Love (Elvin Bishop Cover, Live)”
71. Bedouine — “Let Me In Your Life (Bill Withers Cover)”
72. Rhye — “Hymn (Becky and the Birds Remix)”
73. Faye Webster — “Vanishing Twin (Blake Mills Cover)”
74. Deaf Charlie — “Something Real”
75. Thao & The Get Down Stay Down — “Chosen”
76. Nick Hakim — “Quadir (Extended)”
77. Flume x Toro y Moi — “The Difference”

Good Music To Avert The Collapse Of American Democracy: Volume 2 is out 10/2. Pre-order it here.

Some of the artists covered here are Warner Music artists. Uproxx is an independent subsidiary of Warner Music Group.

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Azuma Makoto’s Provocative Botanical Sculptures, in “Flower Punk”

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Who is the most audacious floral sculptor alive? If you guessed Jeff Koons, whose “Puppy” requires some thirty-eight-thousand flowers to build, you’re wrong. The correct answer is Azuma Makoto, the Japanese botanical artist who is the star of “Flower Punk,” Alison Klayman’s delightful, and unexpectedly moving, documentary film. Koons’s terrier may rise more than forty feet in the air, but Azuma’s work is literally stratospheric: in 2014, he launched an avant-ikebana arrangement of orchids, lilies, hydrangeas, and irises into the atmosphere. He has also submerged his designs more than a thousand metres below the surface of the sea, an odyssey that took three years to get right. Archival footage of both projects appears in Klayman’s half-hour-long portrait, which reveals more than a florist-provocateur—like many punks, at heart Azuma is a poet, whose true subject is the fleeting nature of life. As Klayman described Azuma to me in a recent e-mail, “He’s struggling with how to draw out the most vitality and beauty in something that is always moving towards death and decay.” This is the great conundrum conveyed by floral art through the ages, from the collars woven of olive leaves, cornflowers, and poppies buried in King Tutankhamun’s tomb, to the soon-to-wilt blooms in the lush still-life paintings of the Dutch Golden Age.

Azuma, who grew up in a country village in Fukuoka Prefecture, was a punk before he was a florist. In the nineties, he left home for Tokyo with teen dreams of making it big with the band in which he played bass. Now in his mid-forties, he still looks the part of a boyish musician, with his bleached-blond hair, mad-scientist lab coat, and angsty resting face. He found his true calling by accident when, strapped for cash, he spotted a sign advertising jobs at a neighborhood florist. His enthusiasm for his new work was contagious, and soon his bandmate and high-school friend Shiinoki Shunsuke—who is now a botanical photographer and Azuma’s business partner—had a gig washing buckets. In 2002, the pair opened their own shop. In their first two years, the business was so unsuccessful that it inspired an inadvertent Zen koan: Is it a store if it has zero customers? Around this time, Azuma, always more artist than florist, was trying to exhibit his edgy arrangements in Tokyo galleries, with little success. So, true to punk’s D.I.Y. ethos, he started to put on his own shows. Glistening slabs of raw meat festooned with blood-red flowers became a Grand Guignol hanging garden; an unpotted bonsai tree floating inside a tank was the animate cousin of a Koons basketball; the stems of abundant white lilies were replaced with shiny industrial hardware, like so many horticultural cyborgs. As the artist reminisces about his early projects to Klayman in the film, “Looking back, those works were very bold—bold and a little absurd.” His experimental approach caught the eye of the fashion world, and commissions followed; he has since created eye-catching installations for such high-profile clients as Fendi, Hermès, and Dries Van Noten, whose runway he lined with colorful arrangements suspended in blocks of ice.

For all his daredevilry, conceptual innovation, and commercial success, what ultimately makes Azuma such a riveting subject is surprisingly simple: his reverence. The sixteen-hundred-year-old ritual art form of ikebana isn’t mentioned in Klayman’s film, but the idea of flowers as contemplative offerings is never far from Azuma’s mind, even when he’s wielding a blowtorch. In the film’s most affecting passage, he identifies the 2011 earthquake and tsunami as a turning point in his art, describing a permanent installation he conceived for a school in Fukushima as “a prayer, a way to remember.” Klayman, who has directed two previous documentaries about artists—Ai Weiwei and the centenarian painter Carmen Herrera—characterized her experience with Azuma as being a “sanctuary.” This isn’t only because of the grace and strength of her subject; it’s also about who he’s not. Klayman shot “Flower Punk” on a break from filming her long-form documentary, “The Brink,” for which she spent thirteen months tailing the former White House strategist Steve Bannon. “Working on ‘Flower Punk’ was a chance to get out of that milieu,” she told me. “It was psychically darker and had me constantly engaged with politics and breaking news. It was like a refreshing reset to be surrounded by and contemplating beauty.”

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