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‘$400 Million Is a Peanut’: Trump Admits to, Downplays Massive Debt During Town Hall

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After three straight nights of braying about his greatness and dancing to the Village People in front of his most devoted supporters, President Trump ran into a buzzsaw in Miami on Thursday. Unlike his rallies, the town hall event hosted by NBC took place in reality, and a confused, exceptionally moist Trump spent the better part of the hour wilting questions from moderator Savannah Guthrie.

Trump’s flop sweat may have been glistening the brightest when Guthrie grilled him over his taxes, a subject of intense speculation since his initial refusal to release his returns prior to the 2016 election. His financials cycled back into the spotlight late last month after The New York Times released a report finding that the president only paid $750 in income tax for years — and that he currently is at least $421 million in debt. Trump has for the most part dodged addressing the report, but Guthrie pressed him over the particulars at length on Thursday.

When asked about the $750 number, Trump didn’t explicitly deny he paid less than a month’s rent on a modest studio apartment to the government every year. Instead, he argued that $750 was only a “statutory number” and a “filing number” before saying he doesn’t know how much he pays annually.

Trump then said the numbers in the Times’ report were “wrong” and that the reporters responsible should probably be in jail for gaining access to his tax return information, because why not?

Though Trump claimed the numbers in the report were wrong, Guthrie was able to get him to admit for the first time that he does indeed owe north of $400 million. Don’t worry, though; he claims it only makes up a “tiny percentage” of his worth.

“$400 million is a peanut,” the president said. Very relatable.

To whom does Trump owe this paltry sum? Not Russia, he said. What about a foreign bank, Guthrie asked? “Not that I know of,” Trump said. “But because it’s so easy to solve, and if you’d like to do, I will let you know whoever I owe such a small amount of money.”

Whether this is actually true is a mystery, and a crucial issue as Trump seeks another term in office. Much of the $421 million Trump owes is coming due in the next four years. This is a problem. “There’s the concern that a president who is personally on the hook for significant loans that come due while he’s the president might take official actions, or appear to take official actions, that are meant to alleviate the personal financial pressure he faces,” University of Texas School of Law professor Steve Vladeck told Rolling Stone last month. “Indeed, there’s a reason why the federal government generally won’t give security clearances to those who have significant debt — it’s because they’re too much of a risk. So, too, apparently, is the president of the United States.”

One way to clear up what kind of financial pressure the president might be facing would be for him to release his tax returns, as every major presidential candidate has done for decades. Since initially refusing to do so, Trump has claimed that he really, really would love to release the returns, but he can’t because they’re under audit. He did the same when Guthrie asked him about it on Thursday, but when she kept pointing out that an audit in no way precludes him from releasing the returns, Trump didn’t disagree, saying that he’s not releasing them due to “common sense, and intelligence, and having lawyers that say—”

But he didn’t finish the thought, instead pivoting to his “rather massive” income.

None of this provided any clarity whatsoever about the president’s financial situation. Instead, Trump’s frantic, sweaty responses only reinforced the idea that he’s lying about something, whether it be how much he’s paying in taxes, to whom he owes money, or how much he’s worth. More than likely, it’s all of the above.

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Makeup Shades For Dark Skin Are Not Inclusive & Problematic

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When I was younger, I did a lot of acting. I landed major parts in school plays and commercials and played an extra in a couple well-known films. I loved acting: the challenge of memorizing lines, learning how to emphasize dramatic monologues, and exercising my love of accents — it was great. But one thing that always bothered me was the makeup I’d have to wear from scene to scene.

Fifteen years ago, makeup was not as diverse as it is today. There was no Fenty Beauty, Cover FX, or A.P.D.G. to provide us with authentic color-matching shades. For people of color like myself, our only options were nude, beige, brown, chocolate, and mocha. None of these shades ever matched my slightly fair with brown undertones skin.

Back then, I was too young and naive to complain to the makeup artist or costume director, but I was very conscious of how my onscreen makeup didn’t match the color of my neck and body. When I’d make a face after I was all made up, the makeup artist would always say something like, “We added more makeup because of the onstage lights; don’t worry, you look fine!”

The majority of the makeup used on me was labeled as “nude” — which was a shade above beige — but it was confusing that “nude” never actually matched my skin tone. The experience my white counterparts had was totally different; their makeup — labeled “porcelain,” “ivory,” or “rose” — seemed to blend in perfectly with their fair skin, while mine looked uneven and wrong. I quickly realized the makeup industry was aware of the variations of white skin. It provided white customers with numerous options and appeared to be oblivious that Black skin could have such variations as well.

I hated my stage makeup. The transformation never made me feel pretty or myself. My white friends had the option to choose from “rose,” “honey,” or “ivory” and leave the chair with glowy skin, ready to accept a Tony. The makeup shade names did exactly what they promised: provide a rosy tint or honey glow. I, on the other hand, had to choose between coffee or cream, neither of which fit my skin color. In fact, the entire experience of my acting career turned me off makeup entirely in my personal life. And I’m not alone: people of color have expressed frustration around accurate shades of color and proper naming of these colors for years.

Unfortunately, while shade ranges have expanded in options for darker skin tones, not much has changed in the beauty industry when it comes to the names of these shades. From time to time, I still see “mocha,” “butter pecan,” “espresso,” “hot chocolate,” and even “chia” (or my favorite, “Yikes” and “Typo” from a huge cosmetics brand). This degree of naming reinforces the problem that elevating European beauty standards (fair skin, blue eyes, straight hair) is the norm while only tolerating darker complexions. Not to mention chocolate, sugar, and, coffee are all historical products of slave labor. This is hugely problematic and offensive. It makes me, and other Black women I know, feel small and unseen. It makes us feel like an afterthought.

I’m sick of being labeled as a basic brown caffeinated drink. I want to be treated as an equal and see creative names like “maintaining my sand-ity,” “tanacious spirit,” or “barefoot in Barcelona” that you see on store shelves that are catered to white people. When I see these, it makes me realize how much thought and creativity were put into the product, only to be followed up with “chocolate” or “mocha” for darker skin tones. To be clear, “nude” and “espresso” are not inclusive; in fact, they overlook many people of color. Not all Black or brown people have the same skin tone, therefore there should not be a one-color-fits-all solution. As a consumer, it looks lazy and instantly tells me the brand does not care about its POC customers.

I strongly believe real change will only happen if we build a common language and understanding around these critical conversations. Beauty brands can no longer say they stand with the Black community and not address the language they are using to describe the Black community.

The beauty industry must make it its duty and responsibility to ensure its products are empowering and inclusive — both in their offering and labeling. Words are powerful, and words matter.

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Who Is the Mushroom on ‘The Masked Singer’? Fans Predict It’s …

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The Masked Singer is back and providing an uplifting distraction from the problems that people continue to face in 2020. The Fox reality series has celebrities dress up in crazy costumes and perform for a panel of judges. Aside from trying to guess what A-lister is behind the mask solely based off of their voice, the show also drops clues as to the identity of the celebrity.

While Season 4 has already unmasked some of its Hollywood talent, there are a lot of identities that have not been revealed. One of the trippiest costumes this season has definitely got to be the Mushroom. And, based on the clues that were given prior to the Mushroom’s performance (airing Oct. 28), audiences are already making their educated guesses as to this person’s identity.

Who is the Mushroom on ‘The Masked Singer’?

In a promo clip for the Mushroom, the individual offered these clues: “Mushrooms are resilient and thrive in all circumstances. Being here has made me realize this show is fertile ground to explore another side of yourself.” Adding, “If you want to know who’s behind my mask, you’ll need to figure out who’s under … My hats,” the unknown celeb said while sporting different mushroom hats.

As always, fans are attempting to guess just who is under Mushroom’s hat. One Twitter user suggested that the masked individual is A-list star Johnny Depp.

“Johnny Depp! All the clues match mushroom, squirrel, truffle, puppy dog eyes, hats and one of the first words said in the clue package was Wonderland. DUH!” the individual wrote.

Another social media user suggested that Billy Porter is the Mushroom. However, this is not the first time the award-winning actor’s name has been thrown into The Masked Singer mix. Last year, fans theorized that the Pose star was the Leopard. Billy shut down those rumors in an exclusive interview with Distractify.

“I’ve never seen the show. I don’t know what it is about,” he told us. “I’m telling you now, if you say it’s Billy Porter, you will lose ’cause it ain’t me! It’s not me.”

So, did the actor finally decide to do the show?

One individual thinks the Mushroom could be celebrity chef, lifestyle guru, and TV personality Martha Stewart. Well, the 79-year-old certainly wears many “hats.”

And, Martha has hinted in a previous interview that she would be down to participate in the reality television show.

Her Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party co-star Snoop Dogg told Yahoo Entertainment in January, “I would love to be on that show. I be watching that show at home like, ‘Damn, why didn’t they call me?’ So if y’all watching and looking on it, producers and writers: Snoop Dogg is down to do it.”

Martha commented a few costume ideas if she were on the show, saying, “I’d be like an apricot tree or something. … Or a pomegranate.”

Could Snoop and Martha both be competing on Season 4 of The Masked Singer? We certainly hope so!

The Masked Singer airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m. ET on Fox.

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‘Alf’ star Max Wright dead at 75 after long struggle with cancer

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‘Alf’ actor Max Wright, popular for playing the father in the hit 80s show, died on Wednesday after a long struggle with cancer. He was 75 years old and was diagnosed with Lymphoma in 1995, but had been in remission for a long time.

According to a report in TMZ, family sources were quoted as saying that the actor passed away at his residence in Hermosa Beach, California just outside Los Angeles.

The actor was a veteran TV star well-known for his role as Willie Tanner in the puppet-led show, which ran for four seasons on NBC. Other than this role, he was also known for his roles in TV shows ‘Buffalo Bill’, ‘Cheers’,  ‘Misfits of Science’, ‘Dudley’ and ‘Norm’.

His popular movies include ‘All That Jazz’, ‘Reds’, ‘The Sting II’, ‘Soul Man’ and ‘The Shadow’. The actor had about 60 credits to his name since 1974.

Linda Ybarrondo, Wright’s wife to whom he was married since 1965, died in 2017 due to breast cancer. The couple had two children. Michu Meszaros, Wright’s co-star on ‘Alf’ passed away in June 2016 at the age of 76.

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