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Best Lines of the Week (October 9-15): ‘Opportunity Knocked’

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Making us laugh this week were spit-fire puns on Bob’s Burgers, moments of reality on Fargo, and an already meme-worthy Megan Thee Stallion reference on Jeopardy!.

Meanwhile, streaming brought a new season of Star Trek: Discovery, with a new word for stealing, and another installment of the Haunting anthology series, Bly Manor, with words of wisdom.

Scroll down for those moments and more from this week’s standout TV.

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Facebook files lawsuit against two individuals for selling fake Instagram followers & likes

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On Tuesday, social media giant, Facebook announced that it has filed two lawsuit for selling fake followers on Instagram and for increasing likes on the posts. The company has filed the lawsuit against four individuals two of them are from New York while the other two of them are from Dubai.

What happened?

As per the recent blog shared by Facebook all these individuals were using the website boostgram.com and instant-fans.com in order to sell likes and followers on Instagram.

What did Facebook say?

In its recent blog, Facebook wrote: “Today, we filed separate lawsuits in federal court against four individuals providing services intended to artificially inflate likes and followers of Instagram accounts, a practice known as fake engagement. Defendants Sean Heilweil and Jarrett Lusso, from New York, provided their service using the website boostgram.com. Defendants Laila Abou Trabi and Robin Abou Trabi, based in Dubai, used the website instant-fans.com.”

The giant also informed that Boostgram was mainly used for increasing fake engagement on the Instagram account of a user. Boostgram provided a way to “increase Instagram exposure”.

Face also informed that, before filing the lawsuits against these companies it had sent cease and desist letters to inform them. The letter informed them that they were working against the Terms of Use, Policies, and Community Guidelines of the social media app Instagram.

Facebook also took various actions against the businesses which are involved in running scams online. To curb this practice, Facebook has sent cease and desist letters to 7 businesses, currently active in Asia and Europe.

At present these companies are involved in fraud practices with the users who purchased items from their sites.

At the same time, Facebook also announced that it wants to stop these malpractices of increasing fake engagement on social media accounts permanently.

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Lego Sesame Street set is for big kids and small adults

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Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch, Cookie Monster, and more are all being made into Lego minifigures, as part of the first ever Sesame Street set.

New York City has never looked so friendly as in the new Lego Sesame Street set, the latest in the Lego Ideas line where designs are created by and voted on by fans.

Previous Lego Ideas sets have included everything from a pirate ship to Central Perk from Friends, with fans first posting their creations on the Lego Ideas website and then others voting on whether they like them or not.

If any design gets over 10,000 votes it’s then automatically considered by Lego for turning into a real set and that’s exactly what happened with designer Ivan Guerrero, who will now get a small cut of the profits.

The set includes the whole of 123 Sesame Street, where Bert and Ernie live, as well Hooper’s Store, Big Bird’s nest, and the rubbish bin where Oscar the Grouch resides.

Since Muppet characters are pretty weird shapes all the figures have specially moulded heads, including Elmo and Cookie Monster, and especially Big Bird.

You also have lots of smaller Lego details, from a representation of Oscar’s pet worm Slimey to a poster for Biff & Sully’s construction company and even a nod to Count von Count.

The whole thing is made up of 1,367 pieces and measures 9” (24cm) high, 13.5” (35cm) wide and 8.2” (21cm) deep.

It’ll be released on November 1 in Lego stores and on Lego.com, where it’ll cost £109.99.

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Final Biden-Trump Debate an Improvement Due to Better Moderation

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NBC News’ Kristen Welker aptly moderated the final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden on Thursday evening.

The second and final presidential debate between President Donald J. Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday was a stark contrast to the duo’s disastrous first debate in September.

The primary reason for this was that there were significantly less interruptions throughout the roughly 90-minute Thursday evening event, which was aptly moderated by NBC News White House correspondent Kristen Welker. Each candidate was given ample time to answer questions and respond to accusations from his opponent. Welker supplied both candidates with tough questions on their records and didn’t hesitate to follow-up or repeat questions when Biden or Trump failed to provide sufficient answers. Thursday’s event actually resembled a typical presidential debate from prior election seasons.

That’s not necessarily high praise, but after the thoroughly embarrassing affair that was the first Biden-Trump bout several weeks ago, expectations for Thursday’s event were rock bottom. Indeed, many of the issues that have plagued the 2020 election season, from the promotion of various conspiracy theories to incessant finger-pointing — Biden and Trump wasted too much time on arguing about which candidate was more paid off by foreign governments — and bizarre tangents — Trump claimed that only undocumented immigrants “with the lowest IQ” show up for their immigration court hearings and also expressed concern that windmills were killing all of the birds — were front and center during Thursday’s debate. That said, most of the night’s topics were covered in sufficient detail, each candidate was given time to present their ideas to the audience, and Biden and Trump responded to one another without the event devolving into mind-numbing noise. If nothing else, at least voters got at least one 2020 presidential debate that did the thing it was supposed to do.

Welker deserves ample praise for moderating the event. Unlike Chris Wallace, the Fox News Sunday anchor who failed to rein in either candidate while moderating the first presidential debate, Welker did an admirable job of keeping Biden and Trump on track and ensuring that appropriate time was dedicated for both debate’s prearranged questions and various follow-ups. She stepped aside when there was reason to let Biden and Trump cross-talk, but rarely hesitated to interject when the discussion got too off-course. Welker also deserves commendation for asking each candidate difficult, personalized questions about their record, particularly with regards to race in America and Mexico border policies.

Aside from the change in moderation, Thursday’s event also differed from the first Biden-Trump debate due to a new rule that a candidate’s mic would be cut during their opponents initial two minute answer for each topic — a direct response to the incessant interruptions that derailed the September debate. Contrary to some speculation, there were no plans to cut the mics outside of those specific two-minute segments. Pundits will offer their takes in the coming days about whether the new mic rule, shifting poll numbers, or whatever else incentivized Trump and Biden to not interrupt one another on Thursday, but regardless, the change appeared to have a positive effect and it’d be wise for the Commission on Presidential Debates to keep the mic rule intact for future elections, no matter the presidential candidates.

The second and final presidential debate between Biden and Trump can be viewed below:

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