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Melania Trump’s Former Confidante Blasts Her as Liar After First Lady Attacks Her in White House Blog Post: ‘Americans Deserve the Truth’

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Melania Trump

Melania Trump’s former confidante Stephanie Winston-Wolkoff, who was also briefly a member of her staff and helped run the inauguration, blasted the First Lady as a liar on Saturday after Trump ripped her former friend’s memoir in a statement on the White House website.

RELATED: In Secret Recordings, Melania Trump Blasts ‘Liberal Media,’ Reveals Disdain for Christmas Decorating: ‘Give Me a F**king Break’ — WATCH

Wrote Trump in the White House post:

“We all know that more often than not, information that could be helpful to children is lost in the noise made by self-serving adults. I have most recently found this to be the case as major news outlets eagerly covered salacious claims made by a former contractor who advised my office. A person who said she “made me” even though she hardly knew me, and someone who clung to me after my husband won the Presidency. This is a woman who secretly recorded our phone calls, releasing portions from me that were out of context, then wrote a book of idle gossip trying to distort my character. Her “memoir” included blaming me for her ailing health from an accident she had long ago, and for bad news coverage that she brought upon herself and others. Never once looking within at her own dishonest behavior and all in an attempt to be relevant. These kinds of people only care about their personal agenda—not about helping others.

“Once again, outlets chose to focus their coverage on pettiness over my positive work. There are plenty of opportunists out there who only care about themselves, and unfortunately seek to self-aggrandize by knowingly taking advantage of my goodwill.

“Anyone who is focused on tearing things down for their own gain, after knowing what I stand for, has lost sight of what we are here to accomplish and who we are here to serve. To push forward a personal agenda that attempts to defame my office and the efforts of my team, only takes away from our work to help children.”

Said Winston-Wolkoff, who has released several secret recordings of Melania Trump in past weeks, in a statement: “I find it puzzling that the First Lady of the United States asked someone she ‘hardly knew’ to attend her nuptials, join her for countless lunches, help plan the presidential inauguration, stay over at the White House and Mar-a-Lago, and act as her senior advisor. I wrote this book to share with the public my experience of working with Melania, our fifteen-year friendship, and her ultimate betrayal. This portrait is not all flattering but it’s the truth and Americans deserve the truth about the occupants of the White House.”

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What’s the Difference Between Jelly and Jam?

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Jam, jelly, preserves: I’ll admit to having used these words interchangeably in the past. For the longest time, I thought that if mashed-up, cooked fruit came in a jar, it was essentially all the same thing. But as it turns out, there is a difference between these fruit spreads. While it’s good to know the difference for enjoying these spreads on breads, english muffins, bagels, and everything in between, it’s also pretty essential when baking with them, too. If you’ve always been unsure about what sets them apart from each other, here’s a basic breakdown.

  • Chutney: A relish of Indian origin that incorporates cooked fruit, spices, and herbs.
  • Fruit butter: Whole or halved fruit (often unpeeled) is cooked down with sugar and/or spices, and then pressed through a sieve or a food mill. Contrary to popular belief, there is no butter involved. The name refers to the spreadability of the resulting fruit. Also, it is differentiated by the fact that no gelling agent is used.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry

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Inside Golnesa “GG” Gharachedaghi’s Sip & See for Son Elijah

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Golnesa “GG” Gharachedaghi’s baby boy Elijah Javad Gharachedaghi has a flair for the wild side!

The Shahs of Sunset star is sharing exclusive photos from her son’s Sip & See, which took place on Saturday, Oct. 24 at The Enchanted Manor just outside of L.A., with E! News. The Bravo star hosted an intimate, jungle-themed gathering today so that a select group of friends and family members could meet her nearly six-month-old boy.

“Elijah’s face lights up whenever he sees one of our pets and he is absolutely mesmerized whenever he sees animals on TV, so I knew I had to do something with animals,” GG tells E! News exclusively of the event. “I recently saw Dramane Koné in a Beyoncé video and thought he was amazing, so I decided to combine animals, drums and dance for the event and ended up with an African jungle theme.”

Several of GG’s Shahs co-stars were in attendance, including Reza Farahan, Mercedes “MJ” Javid and Mike Shouhed to name a few.

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Total Recall: Oliver Stone’s Best Movies

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He’s won 10 Golden Globes, nine Oscars, and four BAFTAs during his long and illustrious career — but Oliver Stone has somehow never been the focus of his own Total Recall, so we decided to change that in honor of this weekend’s Savages, an intriguingly cast drug drama based on the Don Winslow novel about a pair of pot farmers racing to free the woman they love from a Mexican drug cartel. Given his lengthy filmography, you know Stone’s got some good stuff in his filmography — and the cream of the crop is right here in this week’s list.

The most recent chapter of Stone’s presidential trilogy, W. served George W. Bush — who was wrapping up his second term while it was filmed — with a somewhat muted, surprisingly sympathetic biopic that traced his occasionally haphazard rise from political scion to oil baron and back again. While Josh Brolin earned near-universal praise for his work in the title role, critics found W. as a whole a little harder to take, citing its laconic pace and insufficiently hard-hitting approach as particularly troublesome flaws. For others, however, it proved a warm, fairly witty farewell for the GWB years; as the Chicago Tribune’s Michael Phillips put it, “The film may be ill-timed, arguably unnecessary and no more psychologically probing than any other Stone movie. But much of it works as deft, brisk, slyly engaging docudrama.”

For a lot of Americans — especially those who grew up during the early years of the Cold War — Fidel Castro is less a world leader than a shadowy boogeyman whose thirst for brinkmanship nearly triggered World War III. But whatever his sins, Castro remains a longtime veteran of international politics and a subject worthy of investigation — hence Oliver Stone’s Comandante, a 93-minute distillation of the three days he spent filming the Cuban leader in 2002. While a sizable number of critics chafed at Stone’s aggressively friendly attitude toward his subject, others saw something of significant, albeit flawed, value; as Alan Morrison argued for Empire, it is “An opportunity frustratingly squandered, but one which still makes for fascinating viewing thanks to Castro’s natural charisma. Errol Morris would have nailed it.”

Smart, sleek, and eminently quotable, Stone’s yuppie jeremiad Wall Street gifted Michael Douglas with what arguably became the most iconic role of his career: He was simply perfect as the oily, morally adrift Gordon Gekko, and although Gekko’s signature proclamation that “greed is good” would go on to haunt Douglas, he was an emblematic character for an era in American history when it became acceptable to not only dedicate your life to the naked pursuit of wealth, but to attain it by any means necessary. Stone, who co-wrote the screenplay, based the character on a number of stockbrokers — including his own father — and Douglas embodied Gekko so well that he ended up winning an Oscar for his work. “Like the rest of Stone’s oeuvre, it’s about as subtle as a sledgehammer,” wrote Christopher Lloyd of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. “But his filmmaking style is like heavy metal: When he hits the right chords, nobody plays with as much power or brash energy.”

He earned positive reviews for his role in Rain Man, but to many scribes, the Tom Cruise of the late 1980s was little more than the pretty face out in front of critically savaged hits like Cocktail — likable under the right circumstances, but lacking real depth. Oliver Stone saw something different, trusting Cruise with 1989’s Born on the Fourth of July — and Cruise repaid him by delivering the most harrowing performance to that point in his career, committing so deeply to his portrayal of paralyzed Vietnam vet Ron Kovic that, according to Stone, he came close to injecting himself with a solution that would have incurred temporary paralysis. Not all critics loved Fourth of July, but even those who had issues with the film were forced to take notice of Cruise’s performance — and for Vincent Canby of the New York Times, the end result was “the most ambitious nondocumentary film yet made about the entire Vietnam experience.”

In case you were wondering, here are Stone’s top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. Platoon — 91%2. JFK — 84%3. Salvador — 83%4. Natural Born Killers — 80%5. The Doors — 79%6. Wall Street — 78%7. Talk Radio — 78%8. Nixon — 72%9. Any Given Sunday — 70%10. Heaven & Earth — 70%

Take a look through Stone’s complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Savages.

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