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HBO’s ‘The Young Pope’ Is Divinely Weird

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This article contains spoilers for the first episode of HBO’s The Young Pope. It also contains photos of Jude Law wearing pope garb. Proceed with caution.

The Young Pope, HBO’s latest high-profile series, opens with Jude Law’s title character emerging from a pile of dead babies. That’s an odd way to start a TV show, but it’s not even the strangest moment in this beguiling papal melodrama. No, that probably comes when the studly new leader of the Catholic Church demands a Cherry Coke Zero. That’s God mode.

What makes this young pope so special?

Yes, this pope is young for a pope, but that doesn’t mean he’s young for a human. Judging from some partial nudity in the first episode, the Supreme Pontiff being played by the 44-year-old Jude Law has a supremely toned butt, but don’t let the show’s title fool you: this isn’t The Millennial Pope. He’s not replacing the Communion wine with La Croix or swapping out the papal Mitre with a hat from Supreme. But The Generation X Pope probably doesn’t fit on posters.

No matter his age, Law’s Pope Piux XIII — an orphan named Lenny Belardo from Brooklyn — is a bit of a paranoid, reactionary jerk. After the show’s dreamy opening, which includes a fiery speech from Lenny about taking the Church away from some of its conservative principles, we see a series of scenes where the new pope teases, embarrasses, and humiliates the spiritual leaders around him as he goes about preparing for his first major address to the public. He doesn’t suffer fools — or elaborate breakfasts.

Luckily, he has some of his own people around to help him. The curious nun who raised him (played by a stern but playful Diane Keaton) arrives to provide guidance. His mentor Cardinal Michael Spencer (James Cromwell) lurks in the background. If this sounds a bit like The West Wing set in the Vatican, rest assured that it’s not. Besides a few scenes of Cardinals bickering, the show doesn’t seem to be especially interested in explaining how exactly someone as young as Lenny became the Young Pope. He just did.

“I’m a contradiction like God,” says Lenny, and the series around him is no less perplexing. Sorrentino, who directed every episode, knows how absurd some of this material is — and so does Law — and together they lean into the ridiculous pomp, garish pageantry, and winking excess of the Catholic Church with an often intoxicating swagger. Occasionally, they over-step — a moment in the pilot where Lenny lights a cigarette and says, “There’s a new pope now,” feels like a bad Twitter joke brought to life — but for the most part they keep from falling into self-parody. At the very least, there are no popemobile jokes in the first episode.

How out there does it get?

The experience of watching The Young Pope can be bewildering. At times, the show feels like a garish pop art cartoon: it’s all bright colors, tightly composed frames, and large expressive faces. (Italian actor Silvio Orlando plays a scheming Cardinal with a giant mole on his face who looks like he emerged from a children’s book.) Its cheeky mix of the sacred and the profane owes more to Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” video or Kanye West’s Yeezus than, say, the austere profundity of Martin Scorsese’s Silence or the transcendental cinema of Robert Bresson. It’s more interested in religion as theater than as gospel. You can imagine Lenny saying “hurry up with my damn croissants.”

Are we supposed to take all this seriously or is it all a sly provocation? In the same way Sorrentino is vague about his larger thematic ambitions, Lenny is appropriately mysterious about his own goals as Pope. Despite the first episode’s fleeting references to topics like gay marriage, abortion, and economic inequality, the show often treats power as an aesthetic rather than a political tool. Lenny remains an existential enigma.

At one point, Lenny tells another priest he doesn’t believe in God, but he quickly negates his statement with a quick “I was joking.” It’s not terribly convincing. Sorrentino takes a similar approach to storytelling, staging bizarre scenes and then revealing they were only dreams or fantasies. You laugh. You shake your head. You wonder what the hell you’re seeing — but you never look away. You’re too busy watching the throne and the young pope who sits on it.

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Radhika Apte reveals real reason why she got married

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Radhika Apte needs no introduction to Kollywood fans after her appearance as Superstar Rajinikanth’s wife in ‘Kabali’ directed by Pa Ranjith.  The intense actress impressed with her performance of a meek girl to a mother of a grown-up and especially her reunion scene with Rajini took the audience on an emotional ride.

Radhika is happily married to her British boyfriend Benedict Taylor who is a singer and she shuttles between Mumbai and London to balance her personal and professional life.

Radhika Apte in her most recent interaction with Vikranth Massey on social media from London has admitted that she does not believe in the institution of marriage.  When asked why she got married the talented performer replied that it is easier for married people to get a British visa and that’s why she and her man opted for it in 2012.

Radhika is currently chilling with Taylor in their London home during the lockdown and will soon start filming her next English film ‘Noor Inayat Khan’ in which she plays a spy based on a true story.

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Jacqueline Fernandez shares picture of her being in ‘happy place’

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Actor Jacqueline Fernandez is working on a secret project where she found herself in a ‘happy place’. Taking it to Instagram on Sunday, the 35-year-old actor shared a picture dressed up like a traffic police officer as she is seen laughing her heart out.

“How was everyone’s Sunday?? Fun project coming up soon! #myhappyplace,” wrote Fernandez along with a picture where she is also seen holding a coffee mug. The ‘Kick’ actor also shared a few Instagram stories of her getting ready for the upcoming project.

Recently, the actor extended gratitude to her fans after the number of Instagram followers hit the 46 million mark.

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Why an ‘active’ approach to risk modelling is key to navigating markets today

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Whether investors are aiming for a cautious approach or a riskier investment profile with the potential for higher returns, Architas’ Blended Fund range is designed to match a range of investor risk appetites. And like many asset managers, Architas predominantly uses two approaches to define asset allocation within the five risk bands used in the Blended Range – strategic and tactical.

Whilst risk model provider EValue’s quantitative approach to asset allocation takes into account the long-term performance of different asset classes and the likely future performance given current valuations, along with long-term measures of volatility and correlations with other asset classes. Yet as with most systems of its kinds, EValue focuses on the long term; it is unable to analyse short-term market movements and fluctuations. So whilst it would have seen that in Q1 2020 markets fell by a record percentage before rebounding, it will not be able to factor in the cost of the coronavirus and lockdown and its impact on markets. Similarly, it is not able to consider ongoing Brexit woes, geo-political trade wars or the outcome of the US election in 2020.

Click here for the full article and to access more about the flexibility of the Architas Blended Range by clicking on the box below.

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